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thecultofnick

April 1st

We had a good suggestion in the comments section of this entry about voting:

Murray said...

Why not just encourage disillusioned people (yourself & myself included) to register to vote anyway, and when it comes to election day, deliberately spoil your ballot paper in a creative and imaginative way (e.g. funny pictures, graffiti, poetry, slogans, rants etc.) Just before you pop them in the ballot box, when in the booth take a photo of your spoilt paper, and then later post it up on the net. Invite readers, Twitterers to send theirs in to you - you could then make a 'Lee & Herring' style gallery of spoilt ballot papers.

How about it?

Well, I'm tempted to do this as I've still not been convinced to vote.

I recently discovered that my girlfriend has registered me to. My card came through the post this week. I don't know. I think politicians are like celebrities, if we all ignore them won't they just go away in the end?

Furthermore I've added a stumbleupon widget after one of our blog readers stumbled this entry. You'll notice it at the bottom of each entry.

1 comment:

Lloydd said...

Hi Nick. As you know, I stood for parliament in my hometown of Maidenhead in 2001.

On the night of the count all the candidates were asked to examine ballot papers where it was not clear if the person spoiled it or not. For example, if someone wrote YES in a box rather than putting an "X". Or, if the tick is next to the box rather than inside it. In some cases where we all agreed, it could be counted as a vote towards a candidate.

I enjoyed this part of the process, we did see some ballot papers where people had drawn smiley faces in the box, or written rude messages.

If you don't want to vote for a particular person I think you could still go and write something on your ballot paper. At the very least, it will entertain the people in the counting hall.

You could also get to meet the people at the polling station and chat to them, as you like chatting with strangers. When I voted in my hometown in Maidenhead, the women in the polling station told me that my Dad had been down earlier proudly causing a scene, giving his opinions loudly etc.

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